After months on the run, suspect arrested in br*tal beating of trucker

An Idaho man has been arrested and has admitted to beating a sleeping truck driver so severely that he may never return to trucking. Yesterday Fort Hall police announced that they arrested 23 year old Stormy Adakai and charged him two felony counts of aggravated assault and robbery. Adakai told police during questioning that he assaulted a truck driver at a Fort Hall truck stop because he wanted money. The charges are related to the September 3, 2018, attack on Missouri-based truck driver Amos Phillips at the TP Truck Stop off of I-15.

Around 2:30 a.m., Phillips was sleeping inside his locked truck after visiting a nearby casino when Adakai broke into his truck and demanded money. When Phillips said that he didn’t have any, Adakai beat Phillips with rocks in his fists. Despite his injuries, Phillips was able to fight off Adakai, who fled into the woods. After the assault, Phillips was taken to the hospital for treatment of a broken nose, broken cheekbones, and a blood clot on his brain. Pat Teton, Fort Hall’s Chief of Police, said, “Through our investigation work, we discovered that Stormy Adakai was identified, the same night of the assault, to have been at a residence with blood on his face and clothes and told a witness that he assaulted a truck driver with a rock.”

Adakai also admitted to owning a black baseball cap found at the scene of the assault. Though Phillips is recovering from the beating, he says that he may never be able to get back in the driver’s seat. “Externally I’m fine. but from the beating I may never be able to go back to driving. I have a hematoma, or blood clot, on the brain, and they have me on some very serious medications. Because of that I can’t drive commercially,” he told the Idaho State Journal. Phillips has a wife and children at home and is unsure how he will support his family if he can’t return to trucking. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, who operate the casino and the TP truck stop, say that the case will be handled by the Tribal Prosecutor’s Office as well as the Federal Prosecutor’s Office.

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